Trevor Dunn

Trevor Dunn

My functional pots are inspired by a love for good food. Tableware that compliments food enhances the dining experience by engaging the senses of sight and touch, in addition to smell and taste.

My aesthetic originates both from a fondness of natural objects and a fascination with tools. Rocks and pieces of wood found in nature reveal their history and tell a story, when observed closely. I have had a fascination with tools since childhood, particularly tools that have developed a patina from continued usage. These wear patterns reflect the tool’s usage. When looking at my work, I like to see markings that allude to the history of the piece.

Firing my work in a wood burning kiln allows the atmosphere of the kiln to react with the surface of my pots. The firings usually take two or more days in which the kiln is continuously stoked with wood. Wood ash is deposited on the pieces in the kiln and eventually melts to create a glaze on the surface of the pieces. It is the distribution of ash and the patterns of flame-work that provide evidence of the making process. Loading the kiln is an integral part of my decorating process, which enables me to initiate a composition of flame-work on the pieces. While making a piece, consideration of its placement in the kiln drives aesthetic decisions.